New and Improved Prototypes

Hi! I’m Jojo Rosenbluth, a sophomore here at Northwood. This is my first semester taking Innovation + Design. I came to Northwood to get better at ski racing, my favorite sport. In my time here, I have also fallen in love with mountain biking. For our third week of Innovation and Design, we received feedback from three professional designers on our first prototypes and worked on our second prototypes for the "Lazy Challenge."

For the Lazy Challenge, we split up into four groups and created devices that made daily tasks easier to do for lazy people. Kevin, JP and PO made a handheld rolling device to lazily wrap a gift; Liam and Charlie made a mouthguard that would brush your teeth; Wyatt F. and Wyatt W. built a wooden garbage can with a lid and air freshener to take out the trash; my partner Katelinn and I made a headpiece to wear that would wash your face.

On Monday, Johnathan Olivares of Harvard Graduate School of Design and two of his colleagues, Jeffery Bernett and Sarah Fels, came to our class to share feedback on our first prototypes. They looked at our problems in different ways than we thought of, which gave some groups new ideas. For example, to solve the problem of taking out the trash, Olivares thought of making a nose plug so you would not have to smell the trash. This was very different than how we thought of the problem, as we were only thinking about finding a better way to dispose of garbage. 

Left to Right: Jeffery Bernett, Johnathan Olivares, Sarah Fels Photo Credit: Linda D'Arco

Left to Right: Jeffery Bernett, Johnathan Olivares, Sarah Fels Photo Credit: Linda D'Arco

For our second prototypes, we all had similar designs to our first prototypes, but we used different materials to make them more sophisticated. Here are the first and second prototypes that Katelinn and I developed:

Our first prototype.

Our first prototype.

Our second prototype. 

Our second prototype. 

For our second prototype, we used a headband rather than pipe insulation, sponges rather than styrofoam, and we made it possible to roll the towel down and back up rather than just using velcro. Since we only had two days to complete our second prototype, we were not able to make it function properly. If we had more time and materials, we would have liquid face wash in pipe insulation of our second prototype. A small amount of face wash would be mechanically sent through tubing and onto the sponges. The sponges would mechanically move around your face and clean it. When finished washing, a towel would mechanically roll down from the top of the headset for you to dry your face off with, and then it would mechanically roll back up. Obviously, to accomplish this we would need more time and resources.